Draganfly Innovations Inc. Innovative UAV Aircraft & Aerial Video Systems

Draganflyer X8 UAV Used by CSIRO to Monitor Bushfires in Australia


In Australia, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) division of Land & Water has been experimenting with the Draganflyer X8 UAV for studying and monitoring wildfires.

CSIRO as been working closely with local fire authorities in order to track the progress of experimental and controlled burns. Time-lapse images or high-resolution video with thermal cameras are used to measure changes in fire intensity as a fire-front spreads across an area.

Read the full article at The Age

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This article is copyright protected.  Written permission by Draganfly Innovation Inc. must be granted to use anything from Draganfly.com

Draganflyer UAVs with Pix4D Mapping Software make Collision and Crime Scene Reconstruction Quick and Easy with Improved Accuracy

Draganflyer UAVs have been the go to solution for many public safety agencies using an unmanned system for their collision and crime scene reconstruction needs.

Draganfly Innovations and Pix4D have teamed up to offer a package which gives the ability to create 2D Orthomosaic, 3D DSM and Point Cloud models using imagery from the Draganflyer and the Pix4DMapper software, with centemeter grade accuracy. The Draganflyer Surveyor Software bundled with the package gives the operator the ability to create autonomous, grid pattern flight plans for convenient, complete coverage flights.

See how the RCMP have utilized the Draganflyer UAV and Pix4D Software in the Video above, or directy on YouTube.

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Transport Canada Releases New Rules, Making sUAS Work and Research Easier to Conduct

Transport Canada's New UAS Rules

Transport Canada has released two new exemptions that make it easier for businesses to fly unmanned air vehicles, such as our Draganflyers, safely and legally without the need for an SFOC (Special Flight Operations Certificate).

These exemptions were initially announced earlier this month at the Unmanned Systems Canada conference in Montreal, citing leaner requirements for operating systems under 2KG and systems under 25KG.

To qualify under the new rules, operators must check Transport Canada’s website to confirm if the exemptions apply to them. If they do, operators must respect strict safety conditions at all times, including height restrictions, minimum distances from aerodromes and other hazards, as well as flight within specific airspace and visual line‑of‑sight. Anyone operating outside of these conditions will be required to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate.

Complete details can be found on Transport Canada’s Website.

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This article is copyright protected.  Written permission by Draganfly Innovation Inc. must be granted to use anything from Draganfly.com

Precision Mapping for Accident Reconstruction and Forensic Identification Using a Draganflyer UAV and PIX4D

Precision Mapping for Accident Reconstruction and Forensic Identification Using a Draganflyer UAV and PIX4DThe Royal Canadian Mounted Police started using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to help them with their work on collision and crime scene investigations. It allows the investigations to be conducted under all weather conditions and provides broader views than the traditional procedures.

This past September, an experimental project was organized by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and Pix4D, using Draganflyer UAVs to acquire images of a staged car accident scene from low altitude. The images were processed by Pix4Dmapper to reconstruct the three-dimensional scene. In this article, time spent and accuracy is compared between UAV mapping and traditional procedures, including laser scanner.

The project aims to propose a solution protocol for accident scene investigations. Additionally, by including the accuracy and reliability of the output results, it ensures not only that the whole process is efficient and accurate but also that the reconstruction results can be eventually used as admitted evidence in court.

Click here to read the complete White Paper

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Draganflyer X4-ES UAV in Smithsonian Featured in November/December 2014 of Canadian Aviator Magazine

Draganflyer X4-ES in November/December 2014 Canadian Aviator

Draganfly Innovations is proud to be featured in back-to-back issues of Canadian Aviator Magazine, showing how unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can aid in public safety applications. The article titled “Draganflyer Goes to Washington” outlines the May 2013 life-saving mission by the RCMP in Saskatchewan, and subsequent entry of the Draganflyer X4-ES used into the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

You can read the full article in the November/December Digital Issue of Canadian Aviator Magazine:
Draganflyer Goes to Washington

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Draganflyer X4-ES Makes Aviation History at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum


The Saskatoon-manufactured Draganflyer X4-ES, the first small unmanned aerial system that was used to save a life is now a part of aviation history at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Chantilly, VA.

In May 2013, a 25-year old male suffered a serious injury in a single vehicle rollover accident near St. Denis, Saskatchewan. He became disoriented and wandered away from his vehicle, eventually losing consciousness. After hours of searching by ground units and a manned helicopter, the RCMP called in the Draganflyer X4-ES sUAS, which was equipped with a FLIR thermal imaging camera. The driver was located within minutes and it is widely recognized that if he hadn’t been found with the aid of the Draganflyer, he would have succumbed to hypothermia.

The life-saving Draganflyer is now a part of the Smithsonian’s permanent collection. The first sUAS to become part of one of the largest historical collections of aircraft, it has found its place among about 330 other aircraft, including the Enola Gay and one of the first airplanes ever built.

Roger Connor, Smithsonian Space Museum Specialist, says “It was the first small unmanned aerial system to save a human life. This was a real milestone moment in aeronautical history”.

Click here to read the press release of the life-saving mission.

Click here to read the press release of the Smithsonian donation.

See additional news coverage of this story:
CTV News Saskatoon
CBC News Saskatoon

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This article is copyright protected.  Written permission by Draganfly Innovation Inc. must be granted to use anything from Draganfly.com

Draganflyer UAVs Mentioned as Public Safety Tool in Canadian Aviator Magazine’s September/October Issue

Draganfly Innovations in September/October 2014 Canadian Aviator

The Draganflyer line of UAV’s has always been known as the industry leader when it comes to filling the aerial imagery needs for public safety applications. In the September/October issue of Canadian Aviator Magazine, Staff Sgt David Domoney from Saskatchewan RCMP “F Division” is interviewed and tells how UAV’s, such as the Draganflyer X4-ES, are being utilized for applications such as collision reconstruction, major crime scenes, search and rescue, and emergency response.

Domoney goes to tell how UAV’ in public safety was introduced by Marc Sharpe with the Ontario Provincial Police, then expanded west to Saskatchewan, including the Saskatoon City Police, Regina City Police and widely through Saskatchewan RCMP “F Division”. Saskatchewan “F Division” currently operates 22 of the 45 UAV’s in possession of the RCMP.

Read this article in the September/October Digital Issue of Canadian Aviator Magazine:
UAV’s Get to Work

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